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BrownOrion

Orion is a 2 year old Chesapeake Bay Retriever.  His breed of dog was bred to retrieve ducks out of the Chesapeake Bay for hunters, which would mean he should instinctively retrieve ducks.  He loves to swim and retrieve, most of the time it is difficult to get him to stop swimming and stop retrieving toys.  When it comes to retrieving real birds he wants no part in picking them up.  

We continue to take him hunting to try and get him used to it. One day we took him to one of our favorite hunting spots. My husband had got some geese and like a good retrieving dog Orion went out to get the geese.  Rather than pick the goose up with his mouth, wrangled the goose up against his chest and began swimming toward us to bring it back.  Even though he wouldn't pick up with duck we were so thrilled that he was bringing it back.  Then the goose started moving..........rather than grab it with his mouth to make it stop moving he climbs on top of the goose and looks at us "like hey guys look what I did, you want to come get it now".

Posted by on in the dogs you have known

Posted by on in the dogs you have known

Posted by on in the dogs you have known

Karma Dog



Aspen was a sweet, lovable friend of mine. He joined our family when
one of my neighbors moved. We found out that he had left a dog tied up
behind his house. At first, we made sure the dog had water, food and
put down some straw to keep him out of the mud. Eventually, we made a
call and told the owner — Aspen had a new home.

Covered in ticks, dirty and in need of a manicure, Aspen was brought
to his new home and joined our pack. By his hesitancy and shyness, we
figured that he had never been inside a home. That was confirmed when
I heard a dog peeing. Turning around, I saw Aspen — leg lifted —
peeing out an open window. Right idea, wrong execution.

At his first vet appointment, we found out he had heart worm. I just
couldn’t put down the dog without trying to save him. Thankfully, he
survived the treatment and began his new life at our home. Eventually
he came to realize that a hand reaching out to him was for giving a
pet, that a hug wasn’t something to be scared of and that being part
of a pack (we have three other dogs and me) was a good thing.

Aspen lived with us for over three years. During that time, he
received the life and love that was denied him at his old home. His
howl all made us smile and when we finally had to put him down, he
left with our love and my daughter’s tears on his fur.

I miss him dearly.

David Gough

I know that we are totally prejudiced, she is our niece after all, but we think this is THE cutest dog we have ever seen.

What do you think?

 

 

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We love this drawing done by fourteen-year-old Dakota of her two year old rescue dog, Echo.

This girl has real talent. BRAVO!

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What a sweet face!

Graduation day!

 

Posted by on in the dogs you have known

Posted by on in the dogs you have known

Posted by on in the dogs you have known
 

Carmel in California is a wonderland for dogs - like doggy DisneyLand.  The ocean beach is off leash and many of the restaurants take dogs and treat them like kings, while their humans eat wonderful food.  There's lots of butt sniffing and ohhing and ahhing at all the different dogs.

The Cypress Hotel (founded by Doris Day) has a great bar where everyone brings their dogs.  Family dogs that will eat anything given them.  Old widows and divorcees from San Diego with dogs that must look like their ex-
husbands, and gay couples with very well behaved dogs.  Our dog Cody loves it all....as do we.

Here's Cody at the beach with Ben (our son).  The stick and the ocean waves are the center of attention.  The throwing and chasing are very serious, both entailing a dance of dodging and head fakes.

 

Richard




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We have been huge fan's of Cathy's amazing art. We suspect you will feel the same when you see more of her work at her website.

 

Posted by on in the dogs you have known

This is Fiona, whom we met on New Year's Day 2008, by hitting her with our vehicle.  Fortunately, she only hit the undercarriage.  We rushed her to an emergency vet who treated her and found her owners through her rabies tags.  Even though she had been missing from their home for three weeks, the owners did not want her back.  After she recovered from her injuries, my husband brought her home.  She was so timid that she hid under our bed for a day or two only coming out to eat.  Now she is a chubby little Chihuahua who loves tummy rubs and cuddling. 

The bigger dog is Pugsley who was found as a puppy roaming the streets by a coworker of my husband in 2007.  He was dirty, hungry and had ear mites.  We cleaned him up and fed him and he is our happy-go-lucky guy who will play fetch for two hours if you let him.  

 


The whole point of this letter is to let people know that even a found dog can be a great friend and companion.  Owning a pet is also a responsibility and you can't just abandon an animal just because you are tired of the responsibility.
 
I love your website.  Keep up the good work.
 
Sincerely,

Eva J Beavers

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 This is Keiko -- a devout believer that dropped food is superior to anything she finds in a bowl. Popcorn is a particular delicacy although she rarely lets it touch the floor -- she catches the popped kernels in the air.
We read that Keiko means "adored one" in Japanese. She is not named for the whale who starred in "Free Willy." In fact, she's a liitle sensitive about her weight. We say she's "sturdy."

Dog Bites Rope
Keiko displays her jaws of steel with the rope toy. It's hard to tell in this shot but she's dangling from the floor. We can even swing her around a couple of times and she won't let go. She may have a future in bungee-jumping.
Dan

 

 

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Took this photo of Ely (Blue Heeler/Border Collie) while climbing in Moab, UT. He hunkered down in the grass and was equal parts...

Aren't I adorable?

Don't you feel bad that I have to sit here ALL alone?

My colors do pop nice against this foliage

I'm sexier than Kate Moss, right?

And finally, I couldn't be more comfy, so don't feel bad...unless you want to. He's a bit neurotice, but I guess we are too, 'cause we couldn't love him more if we tried!!!!

Nicole M

Salt Lake City

See  more of Nicole's wonderful photography at http://www.nicolemorgenthau.com

 

 

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The brilliant Jerry Stein brought us this delightful illustration of Duke Danger the Daredevil Dog. We have been huge fans of Jerry work for a long time.

You can see more of his work at http://www.steindesigncreative.com

Posted by on in the dogs you have known


You know how some people say they have "the greatest dog in the
world"? Well believe it or not, I had one. Her name was Daisy and
she was a mutt. I say that in the kindest way. Over the years we
decided she was a Spitz type breed - maybe Husky with Golden
Retriever, and Collie mixed in. As a puppy she looked exactly like a
Golden, but by the time she was a few months old, her ears pricked up
(of course not at the same time) and we had a beautiful apricot
colored Husky-type dog.

I wasn't the only one to notice how pretty she was. On our walks,
people would admire her. "Beautiful dog" they would say, "what
is she?". I always had the same reply - Husky/Retriever/Collie.
But that was only my best guess.

We met Daisy on a fluke. I wanted to get our little girl (she was all
of 2) a puppy for Christmas. Now that I look back, I wanted a puppy
for Christmas. I had a small Poodle growing up - she was a nice dog,
just not the dog I thought I should have. I wanted a dog that would
wrestle, play Frisbee, retrieve anything that was thrown and
generally run around a lot. I wanted a dog that would go hiking,
accompany me on errands and visit friends and their dogs. I lived in
Colorado and having a dog that traveled well was important to me. It
would be fun - driving around in my convertible, cd playing, our
hair (or fur) flying in the wind.

The first day we saw Daisy, she was with a litter of 9 that came from
5 different sires. Her brothers and sisters ranged from terrier mixes
to spaniel mixes and everything in between. She was a cute ball of
golden fur. My first question - how big would she get? At that first
meeting I thought she would grow to be a 65lb. Golden Retriever.
Floppy ears, sweet face, the works. But I was wrong, she was so much
more.

It was a Saturday and we were making the rounds to the local pet
shops looking for a puppy to adopt. After three stops, we decided she
was the one. After all - every store we visited, Daisy was there
along with her brothers and sisters. Her caretakers were making the
rounds too. We figured it was fate, so on went the collar and out
came the checkbook. We had our dog.

I always described Daisy as having manners. Because she did. Even as
a small puppy she would patiently wait by the door to go out. No loud
barking, she seemed fine with waiting her turn, not wanting to
disturb you. She didn't jump, drool, lick, or bark excessively. How
polite we thought. I got use to having a well mannered dog, and so
did my friends. Wasn't everyone's dog like this? I'm sure part
of this was due to the fact I worked out of my home. We did
everything together, she was my companion. Our days included a long
walk with an off leash romp near a stream. Definitely a "dog's
life". Daisy was content and so was I.

Yes, Daisy was my best girl. She was smart and gentle and a joy to
have in our family. She lived until she was 11. Not long enough for
any of us, especially me. Now my daughter is a teenager, my son is 10
and we have decided to take a chance on another rescue dog.

After looking on-line at shelters all over the country (is Sacramento
to far to go for a dog?) I decided to work with a Collie rescue group
in Ohio (only three hours away!). They had 7 Collie puppies they were
rescuing from a shelter in Kentucky (the pups originally came from
Arkansas)-and two were headed to Ohio - did I want one? They sent
a photo and we were in the car the next day to get our new pup.


Echo is a year and a half now, he is sable and white and looks more
like a Farm Collie than a huge fluffy Collie. He's small as far as
male collies go - only 45lbs. - the same size as Daisy. He's a
stinker - a barker (by design), likes to jump (often with all four
paws in the air), a nipper (herding is in his blood), a licker (is he
part cat?), has a potty mouth (toilet water - yum!), is afraid of the
lawn mower, vacuum and blender, loves to nip at bare feet, is
relentless when he thinks it's playtime and not quite as polite as
my girl, but I guess there's time. What he is -  is sweet, full of
energy, great on a lead, super at playing fetch, has mastered a few
tricks, great with the kids and is learning agility.

Daisy was my best girl and I hope I had something to do with that. So
now it's Echo's turn - who knows maybe someday Echo will be my
"best boy".

Posted by on in the dogs you have known

Mortiz, a puppy
- very big paws and kind eyes.
The family dog two years.

 

 

One of my childhood dogs, Baron was a Bouvier des Flandres, bought for protection in 1967 Detroit. He filled the bill admirably. Standing three feet tall at the shoulder and weighing in at 150+ pounds, he had a deep resonant bark that shook the souls of evil doers everywhere.

Posted by on in the dogs you have known
I have no clue what this dog’s actual name is, but I called him Ziggy.  He was hanging out with my pal Sherrie and I as we were taking pictures at Goffs, a mostly-abandoned whistle stop on old Route 66.  He really seemed to want to get in our car whenever we went to get something out of it!  He was a great photo assistant.
 
I called him Ziggy because the two-colored eyes thing reminded me of David Bowie.  Neither “David” nor “Bowie” seemed to work as a name for him, since dude had a lot of zest and energy… so I used “Ziggy” from the Bowie song “Ziggy Stardust”.
 
I miss him so.
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